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FEATURING FOUR HAIKU
by CHOSHI

Our Traditional Haiga section is the collaborative work of Haigaonline's own team of resident staff artists. Once we have our selection of haiku, Mary paints for them; Hiromi translates them into Japanese; Shisen does the calligraphy, and Choshi composes and records an original music setting for bamboo flute. Finally, Jasminka adds the finishing touches by merging each haiku with its image and calligraphy.

Choshi (Paul Cooper) is a long-time Zen practitioner who has studied in both the Soto and Rinzai traditions, teaches at the Zen Center of Wayne County, PA and is the author of several publications on the subject of Psychotherapy and Buddhism (see our "About" page for a more detailed biography). A shakuhachi player for more than fifteen years, he has been composing musical settings for our Traditional Haiga feature since 2003. Now it's his turn to be the honored poet.

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HAIKU THIS HAIGA
FEATUREING THE SELECTED HAIKU OF ADELAIDE B. SHAW and JOYCE S. GREENE

From the beginning, Haigaonline's signature feature has been the Traditional Haiga section. Here we feature multimedia haiga by our resident staff. Mary B. Rodning paints the image; Hiromi Inoue translates the haiku into Japanese; Shisen adds the calligraphy; Choshi creates a musical setting for bamboo flute, and finally, Jasminka puts on the finishing touches by marrying calligraphy to image. Once again it was difficult to select just one. Adelaide Shaw's and Joyce Greene's were irresistible— each linked to the image in different ways. Why not, then, select both and make a haiga for each?

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Click here for the haiga with Adelaide's haiku:

sharing
the summer bounty
family and friends

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. . . or here for the haiga with Joyce's haiku:

knees creaking
I cover my garden—
early frost

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. . . or here for a Flash slideshow where each of the submissions has its moment with the image.

 

EDITOR'S NOTE: Because of the too-short turnaround time until our next issue, we can't offer our usual Haiku this Haiga feature this time. But look for it again in our Spring 2013 issue.